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Jun 27, 2013

by Buck Tilton

Across the thundering heat of an African savanna, a million years ago, give or take a few hundred centuries, ran something you would recognize as “almost human.” She runs to live, chasing her four-footed prey. Not fast and not quick, she will run, with short breaks, for nearly 24 hours. In the end she will overtake and kill a prehistoric beastie, using her bare hands, and maybe a rock, as weapons.

In order to survive as a species, humans adapted in their own special ways, with virtually hairless skin filled with abundant sweat glands and powered by a cardiovascular system of marvelous endurance. Those adaptations allow you, today, to move through the rising heat of spring and summer. You are not, however, a foolproof design. Overheating can ruin your day—and your life.

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Jun 25, 2013

Everyone gets hungry while out on the trail. Thankfully, here are three scrumptious meals for you to try, courtesy of Lipsmackin’ Backpackin’, by Tim and Christine Conners, along with some great information to know about trail cooking safety. Simply download or print the files below and get a-cookin’.

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Jun 20, 2013

Ah, summer. For many, it’s the best season. Why? Well, for a number of reasons—typically warm weather, longer days, packed beaches, refreshing water. In short, summer is the ultimate season for fun in the sun. And, with school out for the summer, it’s the perfect time for kids to get outdoors to explore. Here, from The Kids’ Outdoor Adventure Book, are three family-friendly activities that will surely get the kids off the couch:

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Jun 19, 2013

As more and more people venture outside to enjoy some good ol’ outdoor fun, it’s always a good thing to take a refresher course on safety. Today we’ll focus on whitewater safety, which is a must-know for anyone who heads into moving water by canoe, kayak, or raft.

Blog > Katie Benoit
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Jun 13, 2013

As the start of summer officially draws near, and as the school year comes to an end, it’s time to start thinking of ways to entertain your kids. Tired of having the TV or iPad babysit your kids? Do you want to instill in them a love for the outdoors? What better resource to use than The Kids’ Outdoor Adventure Book! Here we sit down with authors Stacy Tornio and Ken Keffer to discuss what influenced them to write the book and why they’re so passionate about getting kids back in the outdoors:

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Jun 11, 2013

In cycling’s early days, benzene and vats of boiling animal fat were used to clean bike chains. We’ve pedaled a long way since.

By Robert Hurst

The "Tom" Eck remedy for keeping the chain free from grit and dirt throughout the season is very simple. His idea, and he always uses it with Johnson's wheels, is to take the chain from the wheel and give it a good scrubbing with benzene or some similar fluid. After the chain has been dried thoroughly, it is inserted in boiling tallow and allowed to remain several minutes, when it is taken and dropped heavily on the floor to cleanse it. After being rubbed briskly, it is ready for plain bicycle oil, which should be rubbed well into every link. After that, a drop or two of oil a month will keep it limber and perfect. It is a simple direction, and one that every rider can afford to consider.

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